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Ways of Seeing

1 September 2016 2 Comments

Ananya Pathak

Ananya-Pathak Drishti experienced the deepest paradox of life each time somebody called her name. She felt as if the entire cosmos took this opportunity to laugh at her unique situation. She experienced such humiliation and depression that she wanted to hide behind a door or just sink into the ground. Her parents knew that the name they had given her disappointed her, they could see the pain that their daughter went through each day. Unable to do anything about this, they discussed each day what the future of their daughter would be, how she would be able to regain her sense of self-confidence and pride.

Drishti was a student of class 7 in The Montessori International School, one of the best schools in the town. She was brilliant in academics and could sing beautifully too but ever since the accident snatched her sight leaving her forever blind, she had become reclusive. She withdrew from all the things she had once enjoyed, leaving behind a world that she was once the queen of. Her teachers, the school principal and her parents all felt worried but could not find any concrete solution to this problem. Drishti’s father was a doctor and had made every effort to help his daughter get back her vision, trying every treatment and every panacea. There were nights when he would wake up sweating profusely, perhaps reliving that awful day in his dream.

It was only a year ago when Drishti and her parents were returning after watching a movie late at night. When they were unable to find any public transport to take them home they had decided to walk toward the main road where there was a higher probability of getting a vehicle. Drishti, in all her excitement, was imitating the protagonist in the film and recalling some scenes and the film’s songs, and was walking on the side of the road when a car coming from behind hit her. She fell unconscious bleeding profusely in the head, and was rushed to a nearby hospital. After hours of treatment, her parents were told that she would recover eventually and her wounds would heal but her vision was lost forever and there was nothing that could be done. Drishti’s parents, shocked at the turn of events, bore everything stoically and looked after their daughter.

The author has completed her studies from JNU, New Delhi. She is currently working with The New Leam, a journal of education and culture. She can be reached at ananyapathaak@gmail.com.

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2 Comments »

  • Jyoti Raina said:

    What a perceptive response to drishti’ s world of despair. Reader is left struck by one side own inability to fail to see.

  • Arv said:

    This is an extraordinary piece. I really liked this story. This is related with every child. There are many Drishti’s around us.