Building a culture of care

Usha Raman
Within the confines of their homes and away from the boundaries of the classroom, how are children learning? Are they distracted, anxious and worried? Has the pandemic negatively affected their mental health? In times like these, how can teachers structure care and make learning a joyful experience for children? After all, teachers have always had an additional responsibility as careers.

Home/House-work

Usha Raman
Are we working from home or working for home? The boundaries are no longer clear. With COVID-19 still controlling how we live our lives, what once seemed like the ideal is now proving a difficult task. As we continue to work from home and also stay on top of our household chores, our pre-COVID lives with clear-cut boundaries seem more and more like a sweet dream.

We imagine, therefore, we invent

Usha Raman

With the dark clouds of Covid 19 still hanging over us, life seems to have come to a full stop. Each day brings with it several demands and expectations and people cope in the only way they know – by taking things one at a time. Even so, our thoughts never seem to leave us, and we try and plan for a future that we cannot see. In all this however, there are opportunities to rethink and reimagine, and schooling and education top the list. Teachers’ Day is just that opportunity for teachers to acknowledge and celebrate their own small victories.

Finding new ways to learn

Usha Raman
The past few months have been tough on everybody but more so on teachers. While online teaching has shown that learning needn’t stop, it has not really been the ideal solution either. With little time to adapt to a new mode of teaching, teachers are also battling new problems that online teaching brings–whether it is the lack of social interaction among their students or internet accessibility. And yet there is always something new to learn. There is always hope even in despair.

New and unfamiliar

Usha Raman
The new academic year has begun on a totally different note – online classes, reduced syllabi and of course, new students meeting their teachers for the first time online. How has the experience been both for teachers and students? It is important that teachers share their experiences about what works, what doesn’t, what frustrates, what gives joy – with their peers as well as those in the teaching fraternity.

Reinventing math

S Sundaram It was in early January that Teacher Plus asked me if I would be interested in guest-editing a special issue on math to be published in June 2020. I said yes immediately almost without thinking. Only a few Read More …

Amid the uncertainty…

Usha Raman
In the past few months the world has changed like we never imagined it would. Everybody is trying to understand and adapt to this new reality. Some of us are comfortable in our homes but many others are dying on the roads. Elite schools have managed to put temporary education systems in place while the less fortunate schools are struggling. And even while each of us tries to grapple with this ‘new normal’, Teacher Plus brings you its second mathematics special issue. Some things must carry on.

Learning from COVID-19

Usha Raman
It’s been a strange few weeks. As the panic around the new virus known as COVID-19 spread across the globe after having brought China to a virtual standstill, most institutions of learning in the country – schools, colleges, universities – decided to suspend face-to-face classes and let children stay home.

Calm the butterflies

Usha Raman
Anxiety is in the air. With exams round the corner one can see worried students, parents, teachers and schools. But anxiety brings with it stress and associated concerns. It is time that we started dealing with this anxiety differently and also showed our students and other stakeholders how they can be more positive and a little less stressed around this time every year.

Understanding diverse contexts

Usha Raman
How can children be exposed to diverse contexts so that they can understand the complexity of the world — people, places and culture? How can they understand that politics shapes our world just as much as science, technology and economics? For this the classroom can be a safe space to know and accept the different ways of being. Inside the class, they have the opportunity to ask questions freely and also have a teacher to explain what it all means.