The political and the physical

Kasturi Krishnakumar

It is so true that geography can be either very interesting or very boring. This is because there are too many things to remember, and also too many things to understand. Teaching geography is an art and it can be made easy and interesting particularly if the teacher is passionate about the subject.

manduvalley_spark-central-vindhyas There are many things in life that we read, learn, repeat and keep reading over the years but never understand the concept behind the same. Geography is one such subject.

The study of geography mainly comprises two sections – political and physical. The two are highly interlinked and therefore must be tactfully combined while teaching. But contrary to this, it is divided into distinct compartments and taught separately. In fact, the lessons in the textbook are usually arranged in two separate sections.

Following is an illustration on how we can make a simple beginning to integrate these sections to make geography easy and interesting.

Let us consider the case where we have to teach the geography of India.

Its political geography will deal with the study of states, state capitals, industries, crops, rainfall, culture, sea routes, rail routes, food and dressing habits, etc.

Its physical geography will deal with the study of the mountains, barren lands, climate, rivers, rain shadow regions, etc.

Maps form a very important part in the learning of geography. Using an outline map in every class will go a long way in making the study of geography easy. Children have very good photographic memory and the use of maps can help in capturing this quality in children.

Ask the children to bring blank copies of the outline map of India with the state borders clearly marked (preferably double the A4 size) as it is easy for the child to write on the map.

The author teaches primary children at home having given up a corporate job. She can be reached at kasturikrishnakumar@gmail.com.

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